Language Lens

A blog about life, discovery and culture through the lens of language and linguistics.

We Waited 30 Minutes

was a cheerleader and am a cheerleader at heart. I mean, it’s in my DNA to encourage those around me, and especially to encourage them never to lose hope.  I can do this only because I lean on my own experience where hope was at times all I had.

The Bible states that hope is the anchor of our souls, but what does that mean when the anchor doesn’t seem to hold and our boat is being tossed by the wind and waves?  What does it mean when we wait without getting any service? (This will make more sense seeing the picture below.)  It’s hard to have hope sometimes, and that’s a fact; and sometimes, or most of the time, it’s easier to have hope for others than for ourselves—another fact.  But I believe hope is real, and I know that sometimes hoping is all we can do.

Call it a cliché and give up, but what could you be missing?

  • The best meal of your life?
  • Or maybe a free dessert?

In English, there is but only one word to represent this curious thing we call hope, but in Spanish the verb “esperar” means not only to hope, but also to wait for, and to expect.  All three of these actions are not only related, but they are encompassed in the same word!  That’s a discovery indeed and a little nugget that I will carry with me next time life demands that I wait longer than I want.

http://pinterest.com/pin/250653535482103450/

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